Oct 18 40 WVW PagesLoRes - page 5

Washita Valley Weekly  
Page 5
October 17, 2018
We Believe in Oklahoma
10% Discount
on Your
Purchase
with this ad!
Fresh
Made Daily
Downtown Chickasha @ 118 North 5th
Call in Your Order
405-274-1982
COWBOY COUNTRY CHURCH
4092 Norge Road (Hwy 92) Chickasha
405-320-0055
Looking for a Church Home?
No Fences/No Branding
Come Join the Herd
Lynn Walker, Pastor
Triple Cross Band, Music
Come as You Are!
Boots and Hats Welcome!
Come Meet God in an Exciting Time of Worship!
Come Hear the Word of God in Exciting Preaching!
Come Be Part of an Exciting Church!
Services and Activities
9:30 Sunday School
10:30 Worship Service
7:00 Wednesday Night Bible Study & Youth Group Meet
6:00 First Wednesday Night “Eatin’ Meetin” (Bible Study)
Mosey on in
this Sunday
ALL AMERICAN
HOME CENTER
O ce:
405-224-0108
1227 S. 4th • Chickasha
Kyle McComas
Owner
More Than a Flooring Store
Carpet • Tile • Kitchen • Bath • Windows • Siding
P.O. Box 245
Chickasha, Ok 73023
Patti Abercrombie RN
Owner/Administrator
Rural Neighbors OHCE/ Washita
Valley Weekly’s Yard of the Month
 Each month, members of Rural Neighbors OHCE
carefully select a local residence and a business to be
showcased for inviting curb appeal.
 The home of Steve and Abby LaForge has been
chosen as the OHCE/Washita Valley Weekly Yard
of the Month for October 2018. The LaForges, 412
Fieldcrest in Chickasha have put in a lot of hard work
and planning into making their yard beautiful for
their friends, family, and neighbors to enjoy.
 Arvest Bank at 1927 S. 4th St., in Chickasha is
the Rural Neighbors OHCE/Washita Valley Weekly
Business Yard of the Month for October 2018.
Arvest’s beautifully manicured landscape adds to
the friendly atmosphere of the Chickasha business
community.
(photos submitted)
Rural Neighbors OHCE/ Washita Valley Weekly residential yard
of the month for October 2018 winners Steve and Abby LaForge
along with OHCE members Rosalie Bush, Becky Gordon, and Lois
Furguson.
Rural Neighbors OHCE/ Washita Valley Weekly business yard of
the month for October 2018 is Arvest Bank. Pictured are Arvest’s
David Snell and Gab Atwell along with OHCE members Rosalie
Bush, Becky Gordon, and Lois Furguson.
Chickasha Community Foundation Announces $73,000 in grants
 The Chickasha Community Foundation announced that it will be funding two important, local projects with
its 2018 grants.
 The largest grant, $45,000, is awarded to the City of
Chickasha in partnership with the Chickasha Economic
Development Commission to fund a Christmas tree and main
street lighting for downtown Chickasha.
 The second grant in the amount of $28,000 was awarded to
the USAO Foundation to purchase new marimbas and steel
drums for the university’s music department.
 Foundation Board Member Jim Allen said, “We are always
encouraged to hear about good work local organizations are
doing in our community. All the projects presented to us are
important and we are glad to be able to participate.”
 The Chickasha Community Foundation was established in
2011 with a contribution of more than $2.4 million from the
Doris Wilk Trust. The Foundation has awarded more than
$850,000 in grants to organizations serving the citizens of
Chickasha.
 Laurie Elzo,
executive vice
president at First National Bank & Trust Co., invited others to
consider the Chickasha Community Foundation in their estate
planning. “By establishing this Foundation, Doris made a
difference in a city where she never lived. Those of us who call
Chickasha home should also consider naming the Foundation
as a beneficiary of our estate plans to provide long-term
funding for the charitable needs of our community.”
 The Chickasha Community Foundation is governed by
a local board of directors and administered through the
Communities Foundation of Oklahoma. CCF Board members
include Jim Allen, Pat Brooks, Diana Brown, Greg Elliot, and
Marilyn Feaver. Mayor Chris Mosley and Chamber President
Mark Rathe serve as ex-officio members.
The largest of two grants announced this fall by the
Chickasha Community Foundation was awarded on
Friday to the City of Chickasha for downtown lighting.
This grant of $45,000 was awarded to the city in
partnership with the Chickasha Economic Development
Commission to fund a Christmas tree and main street
lighting for downtown Chickasha. From left are
Economic Development Council Executive Director Cody
Mosley and Mayor Chris Mosley, along with Pat Brooks and
Laurie Orr Elzo, representing the Chickasha Community
Foundation.
One of two grants this fall from the Chickasha Community
Foundation was awarded on Friday to the USAO Music
Department. This $28,000 was awarded to the USAO
Foundation to purchase new marimbas and steel drums
for the university’s music programs. From left are Dr.
Stephen Weber, Mayor Chris Mosley, and Ron Blankenship,
a faculty member at USAO. At right are Pat Brooks and
Laurie Orr Elzo, representing the Chickasha Community
Foundation.
 Have you ever heard of someone leaving a com-
munity a large sum of money when they never actu-
ally lived there? That is the story of Doris Wilk and
her lasting legacy with Chickasha.
 Doris Agnes Wilk was never a resident of Chicka-
sha. She visited only once, but the community has
benefited and will benefit for years to come from her
philosophy, integrity and generosity. Wilk passed
away at 94 in her home in Pasco, Washington, on May 9, 2011. As per her wishes,
she left $2.4 million for the creation of
the Chickasha Community Foundation.
 Wilk inherited assets from her cousin and her husband, Helen and Kenneth
Ward, of Chickasha. Although the Ward inheritance belonged to her, Wilk estab-
lished a trust to keep the funds separate from her own assets which she accumu-
lated through a life of frugality.
 Laurie Elzo, senior vice-president of the First National Bank & Trust, said Wilk
only withdrew from the Ward assets to pay income taxes incurred by the trust and
to give to organizations in Chickasha. She always did so anonymously or in the
name of the Wards.
 “Sometimes, Doris provided the seed money that encouraged others to give,
as was the case when she contributed toward the construction of a youth shelter,”
Elzo wrote. “Other times, she would contribute to wrap up a community cam-
paign, such as fundraising for a childrens park.”
 Pat Brooks, of the First National Bank & Trust, said Wilk made an impression
on his own life. A retired secretary and rate clerk for the Northern Pacific Railway,
Wilk lived until her death in the home her parents owned, holding onto the rotary
dial phone for as long as possible and driving across town to pick up a gallon of
milk at a cheaper price.
Foundation established by non-resident
First Responders
receive home
security systems
 Chickasha
police
and firefighters recently
received a donation of
Canary devices for use by
first responders.
 Canary is a complete
security system in a
single device. Includes a
1080p HD camera, night
vision, motion-activated
recording, air quality
sensors, and more.
 Sixty devices were
donated by State Farm
®
Insurance as part of the
Protect the Protectors
campaign.
 The campaign helps
to protect the homes
of police officers and
firefighters while they’re
protecting ours.  
 The device alerts the
user tomonitormotion, air
quality and temperature
changes through the use
of an app.
“If you want something you
have never had, be prepared to
do something you have never
done” -- Seymore Folkes
1,2,3,4 6,7,8
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